Season 3

Season 3 episode treatments will explore the show’s themes by episode. All 13 episodes of season 3 are now streaming live on Netflix.

“Like a Case of Pop”: The Commodification of Women’s Bodies in 310: “A Tittin’ and a Hairin'”

Young Tiffany “Pennsatucky” Doggett walks into the living room, clutching her blood-stained underwear confused by her body. She’s met with annoyance. She’s too young to be bleeding and growing and becoming a woman. After imparting some ambiguous wisdom as to what this “a tittin’ and a hairin’” means, the only thing that Tiffany takes away from this conversation is that … Continue reading “Like a Case of Pop”: The Commodification of Women’s Bodies in 310: “A Tittin’ and a Hairin’”

Religion and Spirituality in 309: “Where My Dreidel At”

God. The Higher Power. Krishna. What do you believe in? Litchfield’s dietary dilemma as well as Norma’s acceptance group open a series of questions about the fundamental elements of religion and spirituality which earn them legitimization. Norma’s spiritual group ultimately suggests to viewers that one’s beliefs do not to be concrete; one may be spiritual without … Continue reading Religion and Spirituality in 309: “Where My Dreidel At”

Bagged Food Is a Bag of Crap – The Prison Industrial Complex in 308: “Fear, and Other Smells”

Red may have regained the kitchen, but she has lost her right to carefully prepare what her fellow inmates eat. Danny Pearson and the new overlords of Litchfield have implemented the meal program that exists in most other prisons all around the country. While Red may have more time on her hands, the food creates … Continue reading Bagged Food Is a Bag of Crap – The Prison Industrial Complex in 308: “Fear, and Other Smells”

Cultural Commentary in 307: “Tongue-Tied”

Episode 7 is, frankly, all over the place with all of the themes that are touched upon, from prison safety to American media’s obsession with sexual objectification. This treatment will provide a brief overview of each.

Sexism and Religious Freedom in 306: “Ching Chong Chang”

We finally learn the back story of one of Litchfield’s funniest, yet least known inmates, Mei Chang. Prison transporter Pennsatucky greets the new inmates, signifying a change in Litchfield’s management. Meanwhile, we get a closer look at corporate America’s use of prison labor in the Whispers panty factory.

The Privatization of Litchfield and LGBTQ+ Activisim in 304: “Finger in the Dyke”

Joe Caputo successfully sets up a walk-through with the MCC in attempts to save Litchfield from closing. We finally learn about Carrie “Big Boo” Black’s upbringing, as well as her inability to bow to others’ gender expectations, even for the sake of some extra cash in her commissary account. Meanwhile, Red and Morello struggle with … Continue reading The Privatization of Litchfield and LGBTQ+ Activisim in 304: “Finger in the Dyke”

More Prison System Injustices in 303: “Empathy Is a Boner Killer”

Berdie Rogers observes: “When a country has more inmates than teachers or engineers, we are living in a fucked up society. Prison is bullshit.” This episode illuminates the ways in which the prison industrial complex is powerful and its inmates, despite the “good guys” like Berdie who try to “fight [the system] from the inside,” … Continue reading More Prison System Injustices in 303: “Empathy Is a Boner Killer”

Questions of Motherhood in 301: “Mother’s Day”

It’s Mother’s Day in Litchfield and the inmates are being treated to a fun-filled day of children, games, and prizes. But everyone’s got mommy issues, which are all laid out on the table for us to dissect and analyze. It may be “a kinder, gentler Litchfield,” but these ladies’ problems are no less crushing.

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